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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: TOTW 6-28-10: Going Across the Sea


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ChickenMan - Posted - 06/28/2010:  07:12:55


Apparently a banjo tune (see below). I used to play the B part like "Angeline the Baker" but over the last week worked out a version more like the other fiddlers here.

My version - slowish the faster
fiddlehangout.com/myhangout/mu...ddcomment

sample of Bob Holt - the first person I heard do it - he plays pretty fast because his dancers expect it
new.music.yahoo.com/bob-holt/t...-15144467

sample of Uncle Dave Macon singing it
music.aol.com/song/going-acros...a/5667135

sample of Mashville Brigade doing a fine bluegrass instrumental rendition
amazon.com/Going-Across-Sea-Al...0019J0IUI

Lots of samples from the Digital Library of Appalachia
aca-dla.org/cdm4/results.php?C...OROOT=all



From the Fiddler's Companion
"Gwine Across the Sea." Old#8209;Time, Breakdown and Song Tune. USA; Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri. A Major/Mixolydian: D Major (Beisswenger & McCann). AEad or ADae (Monday/Titon) tunings. AA’BB’. This piece has been popular as a banjo/vocal number and has a reputation as a driving banjo tune among musicians in eastern Kentucky and Tennessee, although both Guthrie Meade (1980) and Jeff Titon (2001) say the tune is identified with the Cumberland Plateau region of south central Kentucky and middle Tennessee. Others have called it a fairly common tune in the upper/central South. Titon relays that Mark Wilson told him that it was frequently encountered in the Ozark Mountain region of the Mid-West, where Tennessee populations had migrated. Various sets of lyrics are often sung to it, most being of the “floating” variety. The piece was earliest recorded in 1924 by Tennessee's banjo-playing Uncle Dave Macon, and indeed, the tune has lyrics and has often been rendered subsequently with banjo accompaniment. Monticello, Kentucky, musician Dick Burnett performed a noticeably different version on the banjo from Macon’s. In fact, Burnett copyrighted his version, had it printed and sold “ballets” of the song in the second decade of the 20th century. He later recorded the song for the Gennett company, although the side was unissued (Gennett 14651), the only copy pressed being presented to him. It was also recorded in the 20's by other south#8209;central or eastern Kentucky musicians (such as Henry L. Bandy, who waxed it for Gennett in 1928, though un-issued), African-American fiddler John Lusk, and (in an instrumental version) by Nashville's Crook Brothers (Wolfe, 1982). It was the Crook Brother’s most popular record. Bascom Lamar Lunsford was recorded for the Library of Congress playing “Goin’ across the Sea” in 1935 (1801B2). Charles Wolfe says a "sea chanty" variant was published in 1939 by Jean Thomas in the book Ballad Makin' in the Mountains of Kentucky, collected in northeastern Kentucky. The Frank C. Brown Collection of North Carolina Folklore links “Going across the Sea” to “Wish I Had a Needle and Thread.” A play-party tune called “I’m Going across the Sea” may be related in some way, either melodically or through the title. According to Meade, Spottswood and Meade (Country Music Sources, 2002, pg. 529), the tune is closely related to Stephen Foster’s “Angelina Baker.” Sources for notated versions: Isham Monday (Tompkinsville, Monroe County, Ky., 1959) [Titon]; Bob Holt (1930-2004, Ava, Missouri), learned from Bill Conley, who learned it from his father and banjo player Bye Conley [Beisswenger & McCann]. Beisswenger & McCann (Ozarks Fiddle Music), 2008; pg. 62. Titon (Old-Time Kentucky Fiddle Music), 2001; No. 50, pg. 81. County 542, Crook Brother's String Band {1928} #8209; "Nashville: the Early String Bands, vol. 2." County 787, Clarence Ferril Band #8209; "Five Miles Out of Town: Traditional Music From the Cumberland Plateau, vol. 2." Marimac 9060, Jim Bowles - "Railroading Through the Rocky Mountians" (1992). Morning Star 45004, H.L. Bandy (southern Ky.) - "Wish I Had My Time Again" (originally recorded in 1928). Rounder 1004, "Ramblin' Reckless Hobo: The Songs of Dick Burnett and Leonard Rutherford." Rounder CD 0432, Bob Holt – “Got a Little Home to Go to” (1998). Victor Vi40099 (78 RPM), The Crook Brothers. Vocalion 5081 (78 RPM), Uncle Dave Macon.


Edited by - ChickenMan on 06/29/2010 12:58:19

bj - Posted - 06/28/2010:  08:56:52


Sweet! Another one to add to the "to be learned" list.

carlb - Posted - 06/28/2010:  09:17:28


I'm partial to the Lusk, Gribble and York version and sing it with Uncle Dave Macon's words which fit perfectly. Listed as "Across the Sea" at:
slippery-hill.com/c/

M-D - Posted - 06/28/2010:  10:32:19


As Bob Holt's fiddling goes, as well as Ozark fiddling in general, that is not played fast at all.

It is a good tune though, and a worthy selection for TOTW, Billy.

ChickenMan - Posted - 06/28/2010:  10:59:30


Yeah, there are plenty that are faster on Bob's CD. I actually uploaded this and set the links without having audio to listen, but I know Bob plays fast enough to be called fast by many.

jb - Posted - 06/28/2010:  12:07:46


I likeThe Wilders version( Betse Ellis on fiddle) on their Spring a Leak CD, their take on Bob Holt according to the liner notes. We play this in some of our jams and this version fits right in at this speed,

Thanks for posting, a great tune and fun to play

Lonesome Fiddler - Posted - 06/28/2010:  16:30:46


I love the tune. Here's my stab at it.

Ozarkian D.L. - Posted - 06/29/2010:  06:56:17


Great tune selection Billy. My favorite is the bluegrass "Mashville Brigade" rendition.

Here's a good rendition too :

youtube.com/watch?v=aoBJSJcaJS...e=related


Edited by - Ozarkian D.L. on 06/29/2010 07:06:31

robinja - Posted - 06/29/2010:  13:33:46


I can't find it on-line anywhere, but I love Dan Gellert's version on banjo. I don't have the liner notes handy, but to me, it sounds like the Lusk/Gribble/York melody with Uncle Dave's lyrics.

I've been neglecting this tune of late - thanks for the reminder to dust it off!

Judy

carlb - Posted - 06/30/2010:  08:22:36


quote:
Originally posted by robinja

I can't find it on-line anywhere, but I love Dan Gellert's version on banjo. I don't have the liner notes handy, but to me, it sounds like the Lusk/Gribble/York melody with Uncle Dave's lyrics.
Judy



While
youtube.com/watch?v=aoBJ...ture=related
is almost exactly like the Lusk, Gribble and York version, they missed that the B part repeat is not exactly the same as the first time through. At the beginning, it stays on the D (or C) chord (I actually play this tune in D, not C) at the beginning of the repeat. Please listen to the difference that can be found at:
slippery-hill.com/c/AcrossTheSea.mp3
This seems to be missed a lot by people who play the Lusk, Gribble and York version.

robinja - Posted - 07/01/2010:  10:53:20


[/quote]

While
youtube.com/watch?v=aoBJ...ture=related
is almost exactly like the Lusk, Gribble and York version, they missed that the B part repeat is not exactly the same as the first time through. At the beginning, it stays on the D (or C) chord (I actually play this tune in D, not C) at the beginning of the repeat. Please listen to the difference that can be found at:
slippery-hill.com/c/AcrossTheSea.mp3
This seems to be missed a lot by people who play the Lusk, Gribble and York version.
[/quote]

I also play it in D. I do play the two B parts with that subtle difference. It makes this tune a jam buster at times if I forget to warn people who don't play it that way. To further confuse things, for some reason I start this tune with what you're calling the B part. I don't know why I started doing that, but for some reason, I like it that way...

(Carl - I think you and I discussed this tune on the hangout before.)

Judy

carlb - Posted - 07/01/2010:  14:29:43


quote:
Originally posted by robinja

(Carl - I think you and I discussed this tune on the hangout before.)
Judy


Judy,

Searched but couldn't find it. I do, like you (when I remember), advise players in a jam of the slight difference in the repeat of the singing part (boy, it just fits going into the chorus that way). I have a few friends who I often jam with and we all play it that way which helps a lot. I have a similar problem when I sing "Year of Jubilo" (or "Kingdom Coming") in which the A part is slightly different in the repeat (got that from the sheet music at American Memory).

It's good to know that there are some of us trying to pass on these little differences as best we can.

Carl

ChickenMan - Posted - 07/01/2010:  21:23:17


Glad you all are liking this tune.
I've been playing it with my banjo pickin' buddy for a little while now and we just taught it to the band's dobro player.



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